Cultural studies

Universitas publishes books that consider various aspects of culture such as the construction of identity, the cultural or geographic Other, race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation and the way in which they inform both past and present cultural products and their interaction with consumers. We welcome books and collections of essays that use such approaches as the study of social representations and discourse analysis to (re)interpret cultural encounters between societies.

Racism and Discrimination in the Sporting World

Ed. Eileen M. Angelini
180 pages, 6 x 9
Paperback
Release Date:07 Mar 2019
ISBN:9781988963068

In today’s day and age of social media in a global economy where individuals come into contact with one another at a rapid pace, we all must work harder to understand and respect one another’s point of view that may be directly influenced by an individual’s native language, culture, and history. The sporting world is one such realm in which racism and discrimination take place that is often based in differences.

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Dracula Invades England

Cristina Artenie
180 pages, 5 x 8
Paperback
Release Date:17 Aug 2015
ISBN:9780993995101  

Dracula Invades the Front CoverBram Stoker’s Dracula,a Count and a vampire in nineteenth-century Transylvania, is also an immortal fifteenth-century Romanian ruler. He has posed as his own offspring over many generations and is ready to invade England and create a loyal army of the undead. In real life, the historical Dracula invaded England twice through his Transylvanian offspring, the Tecks, who married into the British Royal family in 1866 and 1892. Bram Stoker was there to report it: he knew Dracula’s descendants personally and, in his 1897 novel, he told the story of the corruption of English blood by foreign invaders from remote Transylvania.

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Dracula Invades England

Cristina Artenie
180 pages, 5 x 8
Paperback
Release Date:17 Aug 2015
ISBN:9780993995101           

gothic and racism 5.5x8.5

Gothic is a culture of alterity: it explores the Other and it posits itself as an Other. It found its roots in the concerted efforts of eighteenth-century authors who longed for the simple and exciting plotlines of medieval romances. At the same time, they were careful to populate other countries and/or other eras with ghosts, vampires, and monstrous villains. More recently, Gothic studies have flourished alongside a plethora of Gothic fiction, movies, and TV shows. These new works employ the genre’s conventional themes and cast of characters, while adding new features for new audiences.

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